About our soap…

 Most of us have grown up calling the rectangular thing in the shower stall soap, when most likely it's not - it's probably detergent. You see, during World War II the glycerin in fats was needed to make armaments. Women turned in their scrap cooking fats to support the war effort and they learned to use oleo margarine and detergent instead of butter and soap. Their patriotism was truly remarkable and inspiring, but after the war, butter and soap had to contend with those new, yet firmly entrenched products developed during wartime. Many of these products could be mass produced for much lower prices. But sometimes we do get what we pay for - like acne, dry stripped hair, suds that won't rinse out of clothes, and phosphates polluting the water - and oh, yeah - TRANS FATS!!

 So what's in real soap? Oil and water bound together with sodium hydroxide. That's it. Basically, a fatty acid (the oil) combined with an alkali (the sodium hydroxide) creates a salt (the soap.) The alkali is neutralized in the reaction, leaving a cleansing, moisturizing compound we call "soap."

 We've experienced unbelievable results since we began using our own soaps, which, by the way, we wouldn't ask you to pay money for if we weren't willing to use it ourselves. Two of our teenagers are off oral medications for acne. We've heard several similar testimonials from others, too. One customer cancelled a dermatology appointment for acne after just three days of using our soap. The more "senior" members of the family have experienced a decrease of lines and dryness. Plus - we try to make it look and smell good.
 
We won't claim it's a cure-all for everything that ails you, but it's a great shower companion.
Ingredients:
All of our bath and body bars and shaving bars are made with palm oil, coconut oil, and castor oil.

Shampoo bars are made with palm oil, olive oil, coconut oil, and castor oil.
Soaps:
Virginia Soaps & Scents
© 2015 Virginia Soaps & Scents
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